Vulcan - Layers and Points | Mining University

Vulcan - Layers and Points

The basic organizational tool for Computer Assisted Drafting (CAD) data within the Design Graphics Database (DGD) is the Layer.  Layers can have names of up to 40 characters and a description of up to 80 characters.  Layers contain point, line and object data representing, in 3D space, real world locations. 

I was helping a co-worker with Vulcan the other day and was surprised when he asked me what a layer was.  I was shocked.  It has been a long time since I talked to someone who didn't know what a layer was in the CAD sense.  In mining and geology, almost everyone has some exposure to AutoCAD or other drafting software, but that shouldn't be a pre-requisite to using Vulcan.  Think of Vulcan layers as drawings on a Mylar sheet.  A single sheet/layer might contain property boundaries or topography lines and we can stack as many on top of each other as we want.  No matter how many sets of building outlines or lakes and rivers we stack on top of each other we can still remove them individually and store them away for future use.  Layers are not the only method of grouping data but they are the most basic and they are a very powerful tool.



To create a layer, use the menu option Design > Create > Layer.  You will be prompted for the following information:
  1. Layer: Name of the layer you wish to create.  This can be up to 40 characters long and can include periods, underscores and dashes.  Spaces are not allowed and, in fact, cannot be typed in this field.
  2. Description: A normal text explanation of the data contained in this layer.  Descriptions can be up to 80 characters and may contain spaces.  Basically, this is a sentence or two that tells you in more detail what is in the layer.
This is a good time to introduce you to the first rule of Vulcan, and it is this:

Always, Always, Always use a description!

It is easy to think as you are creating the layer, "I know what I am putting in this layer.  I don't need a silly 'description' field to tell me what I already know." 

The problem with this mind set is that tomorrow or the day after or next week you are going to come back to this layer and not remember what you put in it.  I still do this frequently and every time I do I think to myself, "Why didn't I follow my own advice and just add a description when I created this layer."

The problem gets bigger if you work with a cross shift or are a part of a team that is working on a project.  Other people can't be expected to read your mind or just know what you meant to put in a layer.  Do everyone a favor and use a description.

Click 'OK' to complete the creation of the new layer and notice that the new layer name appears in the 'Layer' field of the 'Status' toolbar at the top of your screen.  All newly digitized data will be placed in the layer listed in the 'Layer' field.

Now that we have a layer to work with let's create some data to put in it.  The basic unit of drafting data is the point.  To create points use the menu Design > Create > Point.  The first thing you should notice is that there is a prompt at the top center of the primary window.  Any time Vulcan is waiting for input from you, the user, it will list a prompt in the primary window and in the very bottom left of the Vulcan Workbench.  If no input is required, the prompt in the Workbench will be 'Select menu option.'

Follow the Vulcan prompt and digitize some points by clicking on the primary window.  Each point will be displayed as a point with a tie line to the current location of the cursor until a new point is selected.  After digitizing a few points click the right mouse button once and digitize a few more points.  Then, right click twice (once to cancel out of digitizing this group of points and once to cancel out of the create points option completely).  Many of the options in Vulcan behave this way.  They continue prompting you to digitize more objects, and will continue doing so until they have been canceled twice. 

Now that we have some data in the layer we have created, let's take a look at the Vulcan Explorer and see what has changed.  You should see that the DGD name has turned red but if you click on the plus next to it to expand it there is nothing that changes.  Red names for DGD's and Layers in the Vulcan Explorer that have been modified but not yet saved.  Save the Design Database by selecting File > Save.  Notice that the DGD name has turned black and that if you click the plus to expand it the new layer will be listed.  Only DGD's and Layers are listed in the Vulcan Explorer.  Points, lines and objects are not listed.

You now know how to create a Vulcan layer and what kind of data may be saved in it.  You have also learned how to create and save points in this layer.  Many Vulcan objects are created using the same functionality as the points option.
SAHDF36U9V3H

9 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  8. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  9. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete